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How do you take warfarin and heparin?

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Doctors usually prescribe warfarin as a daily pill. Your dosage is based on the results of a blood test called a prothrombin time (PT) test. The test tracks how quickly your blood clots. Your doctor will give you this test every few weeks and adjust your dose as needed.

Heparin is taken as a shot, and it works more quickly than warfarin. You get it through an IV at the hospital or give yourself a shot at home.

SOURCES:

Biomolecules & Therapeutics : "New Anticoagulants for the Prevention and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism."

British National Health Service: "Anticoagulant medicines."

Cleveland Clinic: "Pulmonary Embolism."

Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada: "Anticoagulants."

National Blood Clot Alliance: "Warfarin," "Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH),""Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs)," "Vitamin K And Coumadin -- What You Need To Know."

Thrombosis and Haemostasis: "Reversal of anticoagulants: an overview of current developments."

Western Journal of Emergency Medicine : "Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review."

UpToDate: "Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and parenteral direct-acting anticoagulants: Dosing and adverse effects."

Johns Hopkins Lupus Center: "Anticoagulants."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 30, 2020

SOURCES:

Biomolecules & Therapeutics : "New Anticoagulants for the Prevention and Treatment of Venous Thromboembolism."

British National Health Service: "Anticoagulant medicines."

Cleveland Clinic: "Pulmonary Embolism."

Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada: "Anticoagulants."

National Blood Clot Alliance: "Warfarin," "Low Molecular Weight Heparin (LMWH),""Direct Oral Anticoagulants (DOACs)," "Vitamin K And Coumadin -- What You Need To Know."

Thrombosis and Haemostasis: "Reversal of anticoagulants: an overview of current developments."

Western Journal of Emergency Medicine : "Anticoagulation Drug Therapy: A Review."

UpToDate: "Direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) and parenteral direct-acting anticoagulants: Dosing and adverse effects."

Johns Hopkins Lupus Center: "Anticoagulants."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on March 30, 2020

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