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What are some of the more serious risks with peripheral artery disease (PAD)?

ANSWER

Peripheral artery disease (PAD) isn’t a medical emergency, but lack of blood flow to your legs can cause serious problems like gangrene. That’s when the tissue in your leg dies.

You’ll also have a greater risk for heart disease, heart attack, and stroke. But when you make changes to manage your condition, you’ll lower your chances of getting those, too. The same risks that lead to heart attacks and strokes also cause PAD. They include smoking, diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol.

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Jack Ansell, MD, professor of medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine.

CDC: “Venous Thromboembolism.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Superficial Thrombophlebitis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Peripheral Artery Disease.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Peripheral Artery Disease.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Varicose Veins.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 30, 2018

SOURCES:

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Jack Ansell, MD, professor of medicine, Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine.

CDC: “Venous Thromboembolism.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Superficial Thrombophlebitis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Cleveland Clinic: “Peripheral Artery Disease.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Peripheral Artery Disease.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “Varicose Veins.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 30, 2018

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