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What are some things I can do if I have DVT and are stuck sitting for a long time?

ANSWER

If you're stuck sitting for a long time -- like in a plane or a car for 4 or more hours -- getting up and walking for 5 minutes each hour helps prevent another bout of DVT.

Remember not to cross your legs when you sit. It interferes with circulation. Try these exercises, as well.

Shoot for 30 repetitions of each exercise every hour:

Ankle pumps: With your heel on the ground, move your toes toward your shin. Repeat with your other foot.

Leg extension: With your thigh on the seat, lift your lower leg until it's roughly parallel with the ground, then slowly return it to the floor. Repeat with the other leg.

Seated march: Lift your knee up toward your chest, return your foot to the floor, then do the same with your opposite leg.

SOURCES:

Circulation : "A Patient’s Guide to Recovery After Deep Vein Thrombosis or Pulmonary Embolism."

CDC: "What is Venous Thromboembolism?

Society for Vascular Surgery: "Deep Vein Thrombosis."

CDC: "Data and Statistics on Venous Thromboembolism."

National Blood Clot Alliance: "Blood Clot FAQs -- Follow-Up Care."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Chronic Venous Insufficiency."

World Journal of Cardiology : "Aerobic vs anaerobic exercise training effects on the cardiovascular system."

Harvard Health Publishing: "Deep vein thrombosis."

North American Thrombosis Forum: "DVT: Guidelines for Activity and Exercise."

National Blood Clot Alliance: "Blood Clot FAQs -- Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Pulmonary Embolism Follow Up Care."

North Carolina Blood Research Center: "How Long After My Clot Can I Resume Physical Activities?"

Cleveland Clinic: "Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT): Management and Treatment."

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews : "Graduated compression stockings for prevention of deep vein thrombosis."

Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis : "Guidance for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on April 18, 2020

SOURCES:

Circulation : "A Patient’s Guide to Recovery After Deep Vein Thrombosis or Pulmonary Embolism."

CDC: "What is Venous Thromboembolism?

Society for Vascular Surgery: "Deep Vein Thrombosis."

CDC: "Data and Statistics on Venous Thromboembolism."

National Blood Clot Alliance: "Blood Clot FAQs -- Follow-Up Care."

Johns Hopkins Medicine: "Chronic Venous Insufficiency."

World Journal of Cardiology : "Aerobic vs anaerobic exercise training effects on the cardiovascular system."

Harvard Health Publishing: "Deep vein thrombosis."

North American Thrombosis Forum: "DVT: Guidelines for Activity and Exercise."

National Blood Clot Alliance: "Blood Clot FAQs -- Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) and Pulmonary Embolism Follow Up Care."

North Carolina Blood Research Center: "How Long After My Clot Can I Resume Physical Activities?"

Cleveland Clinic: "Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT): Management and Treatment."

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews : "Graduated compression stockings for prevention of deep vein thrombosis."

Journal of Thrombosis and Thrombolysis : "Guidance for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism."

Reviewed by Minesh Khatri on April 18, 2020

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Can flying in an airplane raise your chances of getting a blood clot?

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