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What can you do to lower your risk of getting deep vein thrombosis?

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  • You can’t change many of the things that could lead to deep vein thrombosis (DVT). But try these six tips to keep your blood moving through your body the way it should: Don’t sit for too long. Get up and stretch or walk around at least every two hours. It can also help to move your legs while you’re seated.
  • Talk to your doctor. If you think you’re at risk for DVT, your doctor might advise you to take blood thinners. These are drugs that help prevent clots. Your doctor may also suggest that you wear compression stockings. These stockings fit tightly around your ankle but become looser as they go up your leg. They make it harder for blood to pool in your legs.
  • Plan your travel. If you know you’ll be sitting on a train, plane, or in a vehicle for a while, stand up often and stretch your legs. Make sure to wear loose clothing.
  • Drink lots of water and avoid alcohol. If your body doesn’t have enough fluid, your blood vessels narrow and clots are more likely to form. Stay active. Regular exercise lowers your chances of getting a blood clot. Even walking can help. Take care of your health. That may mean losing weight or giving up smoking. If you have heart disease, diabetes, or another chronic illness, follow your doctor’s orders to manage these health issues.

From: Could I Get Deep Vein Thrombosis? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/OrthoInfo: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Society of Interventional Radiology: ”Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview.”

CDC: “Deep Vein Thromboembolism (Blood Clots).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Blood Clotting Disorders You Can Inherit,” “Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prevention.”

University of Connecticut Korey Stringer Institute: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

National Blood Clot Alliance/Stop The Clot: “Women’s Health,” “Know the Symptoms of DVT and PE.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “How Can Deep Vein Thrombosis Be Prevented?”

Mayo Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

American Heart Association: “Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on November 10, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons/OrthoInfo: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

Society of Interventional Radiology: ”Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview.”

CDC: “Deep Vein Thromboembolism (Blood Clots).”

Cleveland Clinic: “Blood Clotting Disorders You Can Inherit,” “Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT) Prevention.”

University of Connecticut Korey Stringer Institute: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

National Blood Clot Alliance/Stop The Clot: “Women’s Health,” “Know the Symptoms of DVT and PE.”

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: “How Can Deep Vein Thrombosis Be Prevented?”

Mayo Clinic: “Deep Vein Thrombosis.”

American Heart Association: “Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting.”

Reviewed by James Beckerman on November 10, 2018

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