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What causes DVT?

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People who are obese tend to have a less active lifestyle. Being idle makes your blood flow sluggish, and this makes clots more likely. Extra fat around your belly will also stop blood from moving easily through the deep veins. Obesity changes the chemical makeup of blood, and it leads to inflammation. Both make your blood more prone to clotting. And obesity puts you at risk for diabetes, which boosts your chances for getting DVT, too.

From: How Weight Affects DVT WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Allman-Farinelli, M. , November 2011. Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis

CDC: "Deep Vein Thrombosis [DVT] / Pulmonary Embolism [PE] -- Blood Clot Forming in a Vein, Facts."

Sam Schulman, MD, director, Clinical Thromboembolism Program, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario.

Natalie Evans, MD, vascular medicine specialist, Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

Marc Passman, MD, director, Vein Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on November 19, 2017

SOURCES:

Allman-Farinelli, M. , November 2011. Seminars in Thrombosis and Hemostasis

CDC: "Deep Vein Thrombosis [DVT] / Pulmonary Embolism [PE] -- Blood Clot Forming in a Vein, Facts."

Sam Schulman, MD, director, Clinical Thromboembolism Program, Hamilton Health Sciences, Hamilton General Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario.

Natalie Evans, MD, vascular medicine specialist, Miller Family Heart and Vascular Institute Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH.

Marc Passman, MD, director, Vein Program, University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on November 19, 2017

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What you can do to prevent DVT?

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