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What conditions can result from a blood clot?

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You might get a clot in your arteries, which carry oxygen in your blood from your heart to all the cells of your body. The result can be really serious. It can keep oxygen from getting to your heart, lungs, or brain, and cause a life-threatening emergency, like a heart attack or stroke.

You could also get a clot in the veins that carry blood back to your heart. When that happens, symptoms usually come on more gradually, but can still mean trouble.

If you learn the warning signs, you'll know when to get quick medical help that can make a huge difference in keeping you out of the danger zone.

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "What Causes Excessive Blood Clotting?" "What Causes Pulmonary Embolism?"

American Heart Association: "Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting," "Ischemic Strokes (Clots)."

University of Colorado Health: "Mesenteric venous thrombosis."

Society for Vascular Surgery: "Renovascular Conditions."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 05, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: "What Causes Excessive Blood Clotting?" "What Causes Pulmonary Embolism?"

American Heart Association: "Understand Your Risk for Excessive Blood Clotting," "Ischemic Strokes (Clots)."

University of Colorado Health: "Mesenteric venous thrombosis."

Society for Vascular Surgery: "Renovascular Conditions."

Reviewed by James Beckerman on July 05, 2018

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    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.