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Who is at risk for factor V Leiden?

ANSWER

If you inherited the factor V problem gene from both your parents, you're more likely to develop it. If you have only one copy of the gene, your chances are lower. You're more likely to have the problem gene if you're white and of European descent. In the U.S., 5% of white people have it. The kinds of birth control that use hormones -- such as the pill, ring, or patch -- increase your odds of getting a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or a pulmonary embolism. So does hormone replacement therapy. But if you use these and have factor V Leiden, your risk of getting these clots is 15 to 35 times higher than normal. Pregnant women with factor V Leiden are seven times more likely to get a DVT than women who don't have the disorder. Most women with factor V Leiden don't have any issues, but be sure to tell your doctor if you have it, especially if you've had blood clots in the past.

SOURCES:

American Society of Hematology: "Blood Clots."

CDC: "Venous Thromboembolism (Blood Clots)."

GeneFacts: "Factor V Leiden-associated Thrombosis."

Mayo Clinic: "Factor V Leiden."

National Blood Clot Alliance: "Factor V Leiden Resources."

National Human Genome Research Institute: "Learning About Factor V Leiden Thrombophilia."

NIH U.S. National Library of Medicine Genetics Home Reference: "factor V Leiden thrombophilia."

World Federation of Hemophilia: "What are rare clotting factor deficiencies?

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on July 15, 2018

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

SOURCES:

American Society of Hematology: "Blood Clots."

CDC: "Venous Thromboembolism (Blood Clots)."

GeneFacts: "Factor V Leiden-associated Thrombosis."

Mayo Clinic: "Factor V Leiden."

National Blood Clot Alliance: "Factor V Leiden Resources."

National Human Genome Research Institute: "Learning About Factor V Leiden Thrombophilia."

NIH U.S. National Library of Medicine Genetics Home Reference: "factor V Leiden thrombophilia."

World Federation of Hemophilia: "What are rare clotting factor deficiencies?

Reviewed by Nayana Ambardekar on July 15, 2018

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