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How common is photosensitive epilepsy?

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Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes seizures. People with photosensitive epilepsy have episodes that can be triggered by things like flashing lights.

About one in 100 people in the U.S. have epilepsy. About 3% to 5% of those people have photosensitive epilepsy.

Children and adolescents ages 7 to 19 are more likely to have photosensitive epilepsy. Girls are affected by the condition more often than boys. But boys tend to have more seizures. That's probably because they spend more time playing video games, a common seizure trigger.

From: Photosensitive Epilepsy WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 11/11/2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research."

British Epilepsy Association: "Photosensitive Epilepsy," "Generalized Seizures," "Some Possible Triggers."

Epilepsy Society: "Photosensitive Epilepsy."

Epilepsy Foundation: "Photosensitivity and Seizures," "Shedding Light on Photosensitivity, One of Epilepsy’s Most Complex Conditions."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research."

British Epilepsy Association: "Photosensitive Epilepsy," "Generalized Seizures," "Some Possible Triggers."

Epilepsy Society: "Photosensitive Epilepsy."

Epilepsy Foundation: "Photosensitivity and Seizures," "Shedding Light on Photosensitivity, One of Epilepsy’s Most Complex Conditions."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

NEXT QUESTION:

What situations or places can trigger seizures in people with photosensitive epilepsy?

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