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How do doctors decide which medication to prescribe for epilepsy?

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Doctors can’t always know which drug will work best for any one person. Your doctor will make the decision based on your type of seizures, your age and gender, other medical conditions, medicines you're on or may be on later, and epilepsy drugs you've tried in the past.

That may narrow the choices down to several drugs. After that, it's an educated guess as to which may work best for you.

From: Should You Switch Epilepsy Medications? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

French, J.A. 2008. New England Journal of Medicine,

The Epilepsy Foundation.

Berg, M.J. published online June 24, 2008. Epilepsy & Behavior,

Liow, K. 2007. Neurology,

Steven Schachter, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; board of directors, Epilepsy Foundation.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on April 8, 2019

SOURCES:

French, J.A. 2008. New England Journal of Medicine,

The Epilepsy Foundation.

Berg, M.J. published online June 24, 2008. Epilepsy & Behavior,

Liow, K. 2007. Neurology,

Steven Schachter, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; board of directors, Epilepsy Foundation.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on April 8, 2019

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What are the steps to changing my medication for epilepsy?

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