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How do you diagnose juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

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Doctors diagnose JME with an electroencephalogram (EEG), a test that can find unusual patterns in brain waves. Electrodes on your scalp are connected with wires to a computer that shows the electrical activity of your brain cells. You’ll have the test while you’re asleep and awake.

Your doctor may also want to do imaging tests of your brain, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and a computed tomography (CT) scan, to see if there’s anything else that could be causing your seizures.

From: What Is Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy,” “Absence Seizures,” “Tonic-Clonic Seizures.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Electroencephalogram (EEG).”

NIH Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center: “Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.”

Medscape: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Workup.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy,” “Absence Seizures,” “Tonic-Clonic Seizures.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Electroencephalogram (EEG).”

NIH Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center: “Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.”

Medscape: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Workup.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

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How do you treat juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

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