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How does a person with photosensitive epilepsy feel after a seizure?

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Epilepsy is a brain disorder that causes seizures. People with photosensitive epilepsy can have seizures triggered by things like flashing lights. They usually pass out and fall, and their limbs jerk or twitch. The episodes last no more than 5 minutes.

When the person regains consciousness, they may:

Recovery time varies. Some people are able to return to normal activity soon after a seizure. Others may need to rest.

  • Be confused
  • Feel tired
  • Have memory loss for a short time
  • Have a headache
  • Feel sore

From: Photosensitive Epilepsy WebMD Medical Reference

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

Medically Reviewed on 11/11/2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research."

British Epilepsy Association: "Photosensitive Epilepsy," "Generalized Seizures," "Some Possible Triggers."

Epilepsy Society: "Photosensitive Epilepsy."

Epilepsy Foundation: "Photosensitivity and Seizures," "Shedding Light on Photosensitivity, One of Epilepsy’s Most Complex Conditions."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

SOURCES:

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research."

British Epilepsy Association: "Photosensitive Epilepsy," "Generalized Seizures," "Some Possible Triggers."

Epilepsy Society: "Photosensitive Epilepsy."

Epilepsy Foundation: "Photosensitivity and Seizures," "Shedding Light on Photosensitivity, One of Epilepsy’s Most Complex Conditions."

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2018

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What should I do to a person with photosensitive epilepsy who is having a seizure?

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