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What are epilepsy medications?

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Your doctor or nurse may refer to epilepsy medications as antiepileptic drugs or AEDs. Other names used are anticonvulsants or antiseizure drugs. Sometimes, the drugs are just called seizure drugs. These medications help suppress the faulty signaling in the brain that leads to seizures. You must take epilepsy medication every day as directed, even when you aren't having symptoms. Some people need to take epilepsy medication for life.

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: "Epilepsy Treatments;" "Special Concerns about Seizure Medications;" and "Ask the Expert (July 2003): Choosing an Effective Therapy for Women and Girls."

American Epilepsy Outreach Foundation: "Treatment: Medication."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Epilepsy."

 

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2017

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: "Epilepsy Treatments;" "Special Concerns about Seizure Medications;" and "Ask the Expert (July 2003): Choosing an Effective Therapy for Women and Girls."

American Epilepsy Outreach Foundation: "Treatment: Medication."

FamilyDoctor.org: "Epilepsy."

 

Reviewed by Neil Lava on November 11, 2017

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