PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What do focal seizures look like?

ANSWER

Focal seizures are different from generalized tonic-clonic, or grand mal, seizures. They're less intense and usually last no more than 1-2 minutes.

Part of their body, like an arm, might get stiff or go floppy. You may see repeated, rhythmic, or jerking movements in one place or that spread to different body parts. The person could zone out or stare at nothing. They may or may not realize what's happening but can't control it. When it's over, they won't remember a thing.

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: "Living With Epilepsy," "Focal Onset Aware Seizures (simple partial seizures)," "First Aid," "Is an Emergency Room Visit Needed?"

Epilepsy Action: "First aid," "Focal seizures."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 7, 2019

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: "Living With Epilepsy," "Focal Onset Aware Seizures (simple partial seizures)," "First Aid," "Is an Emergency Room Visit Needed?"

Epilepsy Action: "First aid," "Focal seizures."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research."

Reviewed by Jennifer Robinson on August 7, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

When should you call 911 for someone having a seizure?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.