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What are the different groups of focal seizures?

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There are three groups of focal seizures:

  • Simple focal seizures: They change how your senses read the world around you. They can make you smell or taste something strange, and may make your fingers, arms, or legs twitch. You also might see flashes of light or feel dizzy. You’re not likely to lose consciousness, but you might feel sweaty or nauseated.
  • Complex focal seizures: These usually happen in the part of your brain that controls emotion and memory. You may lose consciousness but still look like you’re awake, or you may do things like gag, smack your lips, laugh, or cry. It may take several minutes for someone who’s having a complex focal seizure to come out of it.
  • Secondary generalized seizures: These start in one part of your brain and spread to the nerve cells on both sides. They can cause some of the same physical symptoms as a generalized seizure, like convulsions or muscle slackness.

From: Types of Seizures and Their Symptoms WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

The Epilepsy Foundation.

Johns Hopkins Medicine.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

CDC: “Epilepsy: Types of seizures.”

The Mayo Clinic: “Epilepsy: Symptoms and causes.”

University of Chicago Medicine: “Epilepsy: Types of seizures.”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on July 12, 2017

SOURCES:

The Epilepsy Foundation.

Johns Hopkins Medicine.

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

CDC: “Epilepsy: Types of seizures.”

The Mayo Clinic: “Epilepsy: Symptoms and causes.”

University of Chicago Medicine: “Epilepsy: Types of seizures.”

Reviewed by Neil Lava on July 12, 2017

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