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What can you do for someone having a generalized tonic-clonic seizure?

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It's all about taking precautions. For someone having a generalized tonic-clonic seizure:

Don't put anything in their mouth. Contrary to popular myth, you can't swallow your tongue during a seizure. But putting something in their mouth could damage their teeth, or they might bite you. If their head isn't moving, turn it to one side.

Look at your watch at the start of the seizure, so you can time its length. Remember, this probably isn't an emergency, although it may look like one.

After the jerking stops, gently place them on their side, to help keep their airway clear.

  • Give them room. Keep other people back.
  • Clear hard or sharp objects, like glasses and furniture, away.
  • Cushion their head.
  • Loosen clothing around their neck, if you can safely.
  • Don't try to hold them down or stop their movements.

From: First Aid for Epilepsy Seizures WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: "Living With Epilepsy," "Focal Onset Aware Seizures (simple partial seizures)," "First Aid," "Is an Emergency Room Visit Needed?"

Epilepsy Action: "First aid," "Focal seizures."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research."

Reviewed by Richard Senelick on July 31, 2017

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: "Living With Epilepsy," "Focal Onset Aware Seizures (simple partial seizures)," "First Aid," "Is an Emergency Room Visit Needed?"

Epilepsy Action: "First aid," "Focal seizures."

National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: "Seizures and Epilepsy: Hope Through Research."

Reviewed by Richard Senelick on July 31, 2017

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What can you do for someone having a mild seizure?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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