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What causes juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

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Doctors don’t know exactly, but it may be tied to genes that run in your family. About one-third of people with the condition have a relative who has seizures.

Some things clearly tend to bring on seizures:

Some girls and women get seizures during their periods, too.

  • Lack of sleep
  • Too much stress
  • Drinking alcohol, which can lead to too little sleep and fatigue
  • Flickering lights (watching TV, playing video games, or being outside as light flickers through trees or off waves or snow)

From: What Is Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy,” “Absence Seizures,” “Tonic-Clonic Seizures.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Electroencephalogram (EEG).”

NIH Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center: “Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.”

Medscape: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Workup.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy,” “Absence Seizures,” “Tonic-Clonic Seizures.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Electroencephalogram (EEG).”

NIH Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center: “Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.”

Medscape: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Workup.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

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What causes juvenile myoclonic epilepsy?

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