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What research is being done on seizures in children?

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Genetic research is teaching doctors more and more about what causes different types of seizures. Traditionally, seizures have been categorized according to how they look from the outside and what the EEG (electroencephalogram) pattern looks like. The research into the genetics of seizures is helping experts discover the particular ways different types of seizures occur. Eventually, this may lead to tailored treatments for each type of seizure that causes epilepsy.

From: Seizures in Children WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES: Solomon L. Moshe, MD. Professor of Neurology, Neuroscience and Pediatrics, Director of Clinical Neurophysiology and Child Neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York; past president of the American Epilepsy Society. William R. Turk, MD. Division Chief, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology, The Nemours Children's Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. Freeman, J. et al. 2nd ed. 2002. National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities web site. Nemours Foundation web site. Epilepsy Foundation web site. American Epilepsy Society web site. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke web site. Epilepsy Foundation Entitled 2 Respect web site. Medscape Epilepsy Resource Center web site. Emedicine.com web site, "Status Epilepticus," March 28, 2005. WebMD Medical News: " "









Seizures and Epilepsy in Childhood: A Guide.Afraid Your Child Might Have Epilepsy?

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES: Solomon L. Moshe, MD. Professor of Neurology, Neuroscience and Pediatrics, Director of Clinical Neurophysiology and Child Neurology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York; past president of the American Epilepsy Society. William R. Turk, MD. Division Chief, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Neurology, The Nemours Children's Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida. Freeman, J. et al. 2nd ed. 2002. National Information Center for Children and Youth with Disabilities web site. Nemours Foundation web site. Epilepsy Foundation web site. American Epilepsy Society web site. National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke web site. Epilepsy Foundation Entitled 2 Respect web site. Medscape Epilepsy Resource Center web site. Emedicine.com web site, "Status Epilepticus," March 28, 2005. WebMD Medical News: " "









Seizures and Epilepsy in Childhood: A Guide.Afraid Your Child Might Have Epilepsy?

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

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How are seizures in children diagnosed?

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