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What should I do before I ask my doctor about switching my epilepsy medications?

ANSWER

First, make sure you're taking the current medicine exactly as prescribed. Missing doses, splitting pills, or changes can make it harder to control your seizures or lead to side effects. If you follow all directions and still have breakthrough seizures, see your doctor or a specialist. Switching meds takes time and patience. But over time, most people can stop having seizures with very little side effects from the drugs.

From: Should You Switch Epilepsy Medications? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

French, J.A. 2008. New England Journal of Medicine,

The Epilepsy Foundation.

Berg, M.J. published online June 24, 2008. Epilepsy & Behavior,

Liow, K. 2007. Neurology,

Steven Schachter, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; board of directors, Epilepsy Foundation.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on April 8, 2019

SOURCES:

French, J.A. 2008. New England Journal of Medicine,

The Epilepsy Foundation.

Berg, M.J. published online June 24, 2008. Epilepsy & Behavior,

Liow, K. 2007. Neurology,

Steven Schachter, MD, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center; board of directors, Epilepsy Foundation.

Reviewed by Neil Lava on April 8, 2019

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How do doctors decide which medication to prescribe for epilepsy?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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