PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

What types of seizures do people with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy have?

ANSWER

  • Absence seizures are usually the first kind that a child with JME will have. They might seem to be daydreaming or zoning out for 10 seconds or so. You might not notice when they happen.
  • Myoclonic seizures -- jerking movements in one or both arms and legs -- typically start around age 14 or 15. Some kids will only have irregular movements in their fingers so they drop things and look clumsy.
  • Tonic-clonic seizures usually start a few months later. Muscles throughout the child’s body will get stiff and jerk rhythmically. They'll pass out and may fall to the floor. These usually last 1-3 minutes.

About 1 in 6 people with JME only have myoclonic jerks and don’t have other kinds of seizures.

From: What Is Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy,” “Absence Seizures,” “Tonic-Clonic Seizures.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Electroencephalogram (EEG).”

NIH Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center: “Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.”

Medscape: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Workup.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

SOURCES:

Epilepsy Foundation: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy,” “Absence Seizures,” “Tonic-Clonic Seizures.”

Johns Hopkins Medicine: “Electroencephalogram (EEG).”

NIH Genetic and Rare Disease Information Center: “Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.”

Medscape: “Juvenile Myoclonic Epilepsy Workup.”

Reviewed by Dan Brennan on July 19, 2019

NEXT QUESTION:

How often do juvenile myoclonic epilepsy seizures happen?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.