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How does age-related macular degeneration affect vision?

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Age-related macular degeneration never causes “lights out” total blindness. Since the disease affects only central vision, people with age-related macular degeneration can usually still see with the remaining peripheral vision well enough to ''get around.'' It is their central vision that's used for reading and detailed vision that is lost.

SOURCES: 

James B. , Blackwell Publishing, 2003.  Lecture Notes on Ophthalmology

Macular Degeneration Partnership. 

Pfizer: ''Macugen Description.'' 

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Preferred Practice Pattern, Age Related Macular Degeneration."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on March 14, 2017

SOURCES: 

James B. , Blackwell Publishing, 2003.  Lecture Notes on Ophthalmology

Macular Degeneration Partnership. 

Pfizer: ''Macugen Description.'' 

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Preferred Practice Pattern, Age Related Macular Degeneration."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on March 14, 2017

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What causes age-related macular degeneration?

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