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How can a massage treat a blocked tear duct?

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One of the easiest ways to fix a blockage in babies (or adults) is to massage the lacrimal sac -- the area where tears drain from the eye into the tear duct.

Twice a day -- in the morning and at night -- take a cotton swab or clean fingers and gently rub the lower corners of your baby's eyes, next to the nose for a few seconds. This motion should cause a clear fluid to drain out of the corners of the eyes. The pressure of the massage can pop open the membrane that covers the tear duct.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Blocked Tear Duct."

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus: "Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction."

American Rhinologic Society: "Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)."

Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group. Archives of Ophthalmology, 2009.

Seattle Children's Hospital: "Tear Duct, Blocked."

UW Health: "Blocked Tear Ducts in Children," "Frequently Asked Questions: Blocked Tear Duct and Silicone Intubation."

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on June 17, 2020

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Blocked Tear Duct."

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus: "Nasolacrimal Duct Obstruction."

American Rhinologic Society: "Dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR)."

Pediatric Eye Disease Investigator Group. Archives of Ophthalmology, 2009.

Seattle Children's Hospital: "Tear Duct, Blocked."

UW Health: "Blocked Tear Ducts in Children," "Frequently Asked Questions: Blocked Tear Duct and Silicone Intubation."

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on June 17, 2020

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