PREVIOUS QUESTION:

 

NEXT QUESTION:

 

How can an injecting gas in the eye help with treating retinal detachment?

ANSWER

The retina is a thin layer of tissue in the back of the eye that is crucial for vision. For different reasons, it can start to peel away from the layer beneath it.

Injecting gas in the eye is one surgery to push the retina back in original position. The doctor injects a bubble of gas into the center of your eye, which pushes the retina back. Your body will later absorb the gas over time. Doctors use this method, called pneumatic retinopexy, if the retina has just begun to detach.

SOURCES:

Gariano, R. American Family Physician, April 1, 2004.

Mayo Clinic, “Retinal Detachment.”

National Institutes of Health/National Eye Institute, “Facts About Retinal Detachment.”

National Library of Medicine, Medline Plus, “Retinal detachment repair.”

 

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on June 18, 2020

SOURCES:

Gariano, R. American Family Physician, April 1, 2004.

Mayo Clinic, “Retinal Detachment.”

National Institutes of Health/National Eye Institute, “Facts About Retinal Detachment.”

National Library of Medicine, Medline Plus, “Retinal detachment repair.”

 

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on June 18, 2020

NEXT QUESTION:

How is a blocked tear duct treated?

WAS THIS ANSWER HELPFUL

"ALEXA, ASK WEBMD"

THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

    This tool does not provide medical advice. See additional information.

    Other Answers On: