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How can glaucoma cause heterochromia?

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Glaucoma, which affects more than 3 million Americans, is another possible cause of heterochromia. It's an eye disease that leads to increased pressure in your eyes from fluid buildup. It can cause vision loss, but early detection and treatment can help prevent that.

SOURCES:

CMAJ/JMAC Canadian Medical Association Journal : "Heterochromia."

National Institutes of Health, Genetic and Rare Diseases Center: "Heterochromia iridis," "Waardenburg syndrome," "Sturge-Weber Syndrome," "Progressive hemifacial atrophy," "Horner's Syndrome."

National Institutes of Health, Genetics Home Reference: "Is eye color determined by genetics?"

American Academy of Opthalmology: "Preventing Eye Injuries," "What is Ocular Melanoma?" "Heterochromia."   

"American Cancer Society: "Neuroblastoma," "Melanoma Skin Cancer."

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler on December 13, 2018

SOURCES:

CMAJ/JMAC Canadian Medical Association Journal : "Heterochromia."

National Institutes of Health, Genetic and Rare Diseases Center: "Heterochromia iridis," "Waardenburg syndrome," "Sturge-Weber Syndrome," "Progressive hemifacial atrophy," "Horner's Syndrome."

National Institutes of Health, Genetics Home Reference: "Is eye color determined by genetics?"

American Academy of Opthalmology: "Preventing Eye Injuries," "What is Ocular Melanoma?" "Heterochromia."   

"American Cancer Society: "Neuroblastoma," "Melanoma Skin Cancer."

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler on December 13, 2018

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How can certain medicines cause heterochromia?

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