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How can surgery help with treating primary congenital glaucoma (PCG)?

ANSWER

Many doctors do a procedure called microsurgery. They use small tools to create a drainage canal for the excess fluid. Sometimes the doctor will implant a valve or small tube to carry fluid out of the eye.

If the usual methods don’t work, the doctor may perform laser surgery to destroy the area where fluid is produced. He may prescribe medicine to help control eye pressure after surgery.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology, EyeSmart: "What Is Glaucoma?"

MedlinePlus: "Glaucoma."

Genetics Home Reference: "Early-Onset Glaucoma."

DJO ( ): "Congenital Glaucoma (Childhood)." Digital Journal of Ophthalmology

KidsHealth: "Your Child's Vision."

Glaucoma Research Foundation: "Glaucoma Can Strike at All Ages, Even Newborn Babies" and "Childhood Glaucoma."

EyeRounds.org: "Primary Congenital Glaucoma (Infantile Glaucoma): 3-Year-Old Female Referred for Evaluation of Increased Eye Size, OS."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on May 11, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology, EyeSmart: "What Is Glaucoma?"

MedlinePlus: "Glaucoma."

Genetics Home Reference: "Early-Onset Glaucoma."

DJO ( ): "Congenital Glaucoma (Childhood)." Digital Journal of Ophthalmology

KidsHealth: "Your Child's Vision."

Glaucoma Research Foundation: "Glaucoma Can Strike at All Ages, Even Newborn Babies" and "Childhood Glaucoma."

EyeRounds.org: "Primary Congenital Glaucoma (Infantile Glaucoma): 3-Year-Old Female Referred for Evaluation of Increased Eye Size, OS."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on May 11, 2018

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What are complications of primary congenital glaucoma (PCG)?

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