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How can you get diabetic retinopathy?

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The retina is a group of cells on the back of your eye that take in light. They turn it into images that the optic nerve sends to your brain.

Damage to small blood vessels in your retina causes diabetic retinopathy. It's related to high blood sugar levels. If you don’t find and treat it early, you could go blind. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to get it. If you keep your blood sugar under control, you lower your chances.

SOURCES: 

American Diabetes Association: "Eye Disease"  and "Mental Health Problem Linked to Diabetes." 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Take Charge of Your Diabetes." 

Colucciello, M. Arch Ophthalmol,  2005; 123:1273.

Hernandez, C. Diabetes Care, 2006; 29:2028.

The Glaucoma Research Foundation: "Diabetes and Your Eyesight."

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on February 3, 2021

SOURCES: 

American Diabetes Association: "Eye Disease"  and "Mental Health Problem Linked to Diabetes." 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "Take Charge of Your Diabetes." 

Colucciello, M. Arch Ophthalmol,  2005; 123:1273.

Hernandez, C. Diabetes Care, 2006; 29:2028.

The Glaucoma Research Foundation: "Diabetes and Your Eyesight."

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on February 3, 2021

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Who gets diabetic retinopathy?

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