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How do bifocals and progressive lenses work?

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Bifocals and progressives have different vision strengths built into the same lens. As you look down to read, the lens helps you see things close up. As you look up at the horizon, it lets you see clearly far away. This helps when you walk or drive.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Blurry Vision with Progressive Bifocals,” “Presbyopia Treatment,” “What Is Presbyopia?”

Canadian Association of Optometrists: “Multifocals.”

Mayo Clinic: “Presbyopia.”

Nikil Patel, optometrist, Atlanta.

Scientific Reports : “Adaptation to Progressive Additive Lenses: Potential Factors to Consider.”

British Medical Journal : “Effect on falls of providing single lens distance vision glasses to multifocal glasses wearers: VISIBLE randomised controlled trial.”

Meniere’s Society: “Vision and Vertigo.”

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on July 25, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Blurry Vision with Progressive Bifocals,” “Presbyopia Treatment,” “What Is Presbyopia?”

Canadian Association of Optometrists: “Multifocals.”

Mayo Clinic: “Presbyopia.”

Nikil Patel, optometrist, Atlanta.

Scientific Reports : “Adaptation to Progressive Additive Lenses: Potential Factors to Consider.”

British Medical Journal : “Effect on falls of providing single lens distance vision glasses to multifocal glasses wearers: VISIBLE randomised controlled trial.”

Meniere’s Society: “Vision and Vertigo.”

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on July 25, 2019

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When should you call your doctor about your vision if you have diabetes?

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