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How do you know if you have cataracts?

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Cataracts are cloudy areas in the lens of the eye that affects your vision. Symptoms of a cataract often develop slowly and can include:

  • Blurry, cloudy, or dim vision -- a little like looking through a dirty windshield
  • Double vision with one eye
  • Trouble seeing at night or in dim light
  • Halos around lights
  • Sensitivity to light and glare
  • Faded or yellow colors, or trouble telling the difference between blues and greens
  • Trouble seeing an object against a background of the same color

SOURCES:

Lighthouse International: "Vision Loss Is Not a Normal Part of Aging: Open Your Eyes to the Facts!"

American Academy of Ophthalmology's EyeSmart: "What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?" "What Is Glaucoma?" "What Are Cataracts?"

University of Illinois Eye & Ear Infirmary: "The Eye Digest: Eye changes with aging."

National Eye Institute: "Facts About Diabetic Retinopathy," "Facts About Retinal Detachment."

eMedicine: "Retinal Vein Occlusion."

National Institutes of Health web site: "NIH study provides clarity on supplements for protection against blinding eye disease."

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on May 29, 2020

SOURCES:

Lighthouse International: "Vision Loss Is Not a Normal Part of Aging: Open Your Eyes to the Facts!"

American Academy of Ophthalmology's EyeSmart: "What Is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?" "What Is Glaucoma?" "What Are Cataracts?"

University of Illinois Eye & Ear Infirmary: "The Eye Digest: Eye changes with aging."

National Eye Institute: "Facts About Diabetic Retinopathy," "Facts About Retinal Detachment."

eMedicine: "Retinal Vein Occlusion."

National Institutes of Health web site: "NIH study provides clarity on supplements for protection against blinding eye disease."

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on May 29, 2020

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