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How does uveitis damage your retina?

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Inflammation inside your eye can also cause your retina to swell. Your retina is a thin layer of tissue around the back of your eye. It’s full of light-sensitive cells and nerve cells. They take in sights around you and send that information to your optic nerve and your brain.

If your retina swells from uveitis, you can lose some of your vision in the center. You may see a black spot in the middle of your view. It doesn’t hurt, though. If this swelling lasts for a long time without treatment, your vision loss may be for good.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “What is Glaucoma?”

Mayo Clinic: “Glaucoma Symptoms,” “Cataracts Overview,” “Retinal Diseases.”

National Health Services UK: “Uveitis: Complications.”

National Eye Institute: “Facts About Uveitis.”

Review of Ophthalmology : “Cataract Surgery in the Patient with Uveitis.”

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on November 16, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “What is Glaucoma?”

Mayo Clinic: “Glaucoma Symptoms,” “Cataracts Overview,” “Retinal Diseases.”

National Health Services UK: “Uveitis: Complications.”

National Eye Institute: “Facts About Uveitis.”

Review of Ophthalmology : “Cataract Surgery in the Patient with Uveitis.”

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on November 16, 2018

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When is primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) usually spotted?

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