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How often should I go to the eye doctor?

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Different medical organizations have different recommendations for how often you need to go to the eye doctor. A general rule of thumb:

You’ll need to get checkups more often if you have health conditions or a family history of vision problems likes glaucoma, macular degeneration, or corneal diseases.

  • Young adults: Once in your 20s and twice in your 30s.
  • Adults: At age 40 with regular follow-ups, depending on your health.
  • Adults 65 and older: Every one to two years.
  • Children: At birth, 6 months, 3 years, and before entering grade school.

From: Eye Doctor Appointment: What to Expect WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "eyeSmart: Eye Screening for Children," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults 40 to 60," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults Over 60," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults Under 40."

American Optometric Association: "Comprehensive Eye and Vision Examination."

Prevent Blindness America: "How Often Should I Have an Eye Exam?"

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on February 17, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "eyeSmart: Eye Screening for Children," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults 40 to 60," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults Over 60," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults Under 40."

American Optometric Association: "Comprehensive Eye and Vision Examination."

Prevent Blindness America: "How Often Should I Have an Eye Exam?"

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on February 17, 2018

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When should you call your doctor about your vision if you have diabetes?

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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.

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