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What are dry eyes?

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Tears moisten your eyes, lessen the risk of infection, and keep the eye surface (cornea) smooth and clear.

Sometimes your eyes don't make enough good-quality tears. This makes it hard for the eyes to stay healthy. Dry eyes can happen at any age, but are more common in people older than 65. Hormonal changes at menopause can also raise the risk of dry eyes in women. Other factors that may contribute are medications, contact lenses, and certain medical or environmental conditions, such as a dry climate.

From: Your Vision in the Senior Years WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

National Eye Institute: "Presbyopia."

American Academy of Ophthalmology Preferred Practice Patterns: "Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery PPP."

American Academy of Ophthalmology's EyeSmart: "What Are Cataracts?"

University of Illinois Eye & Ear Infirmary: "The Eye Digest: Eye changes with aging."

American Optometric Association: "Dry Eye."

Lighthouse International: "Vision Loss Is Not a Normal Part of Aging: Open Your Eyes to the Facts!"

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on June 17, 2019

SOURCES:

National Eye Institute: "Presbyopia."

American Academy of Ophthalmology Preferred Practice Patterns: "Refractive Errors & Refractive Surgery PPP."

American Academy of Ophthalmology's EyeSmart: "What Are Cataracts?"

University of Illinois Eye & Ear Infirmary: "The Eye Digest: Eye changes with aging."

American Optometric Association: "Dry Eye."

Lighthouse International: "Vision Loss Is Not a Normal Part of Aging: Open Your Eyes to the Facts!"

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on June 17, 2019

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When is primary congenital glaucoma (PCG) usually spotted?

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