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What are the differences between rods and cones?

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The retina has two types of cells that gather light: rods and cones. The rods are around the outer ring of the retina and are active in dim light. Most forms of retinis pigmentosa affect the rods first. Your night vision and your ability to see to the side -- peripheral vision -- go away.

Cones are mostly in the center of your retina. They help you see color and fine detail. When retinis pigmentosa affects them, you slowly lose your central vision and your ability to see color.

From: What Is Retinitis Pigmentosa? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Retinitis Pigmentosa," "What Is Macular Edema?"

Foundation Fighting Blindness: "Retinitis Pigmentosa."

Genetics Home Reference: "retinitis pigmentosa."

Medscape: "Retinitis Pigmentosa."

National Center for Biotechnology Information: "Advances in gene therapy technologies to treat retinitis pigmentosa."

National Eye Institute: "Facts About Retinitis Pigmentosa."

RP Fighting Blindness: "About RP."

US Food and Drug Administration: "Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System - H110002."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on February 8, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "Retinitis Pigmentosa," "What Is Macular Edema?"

Foundation Fighting Blindness: "Retinitis Pigmentosa."

Genetics Home Reference: "retinitis pigmentosa."

Medscape: "Retinitis Pigmentosa."

National Center for Biotechnology Information: "Advances in gene therapy technologies to treat retinitis pigmentosa."

National Eye Institute: "Facts About Retinitis Pigmentosa."

RP Fighting Blindness: "About RP."

US Food and Drug Administration: "Argus II Retinal Prosthesis System - H110002."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on February 8, 2019

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What causes retinitis pigmentosa?

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