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What are two main thyroid disorders?

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One is Graves' disease, where your thyroid makes too many hormones (hyperthyroidism). The other is Hashimoto's thyroiditis, which causes low levels of hormones (hypothyroidism).

Both happen when your immune system makes a mistake and attacks your thyroid gland instead of fighting infections. Because certain proteins in your eyes are similar to thyroid tissue, your immune system may attack them, too.

From: Dry Eyes and Thyroid Disorders WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

University of Michigan, Kellogg Eye Center: "Thyroid Eye Disease (TED or Graves Eye Disease)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Thyroid Eye Disease."

British Thyroid Foundation: "Your Thyroid Gland."

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism: "Thyroid Stimulating Antibodies Are Highly Prevalent in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Associated Orbitopathy."

Eye and Vision: "An overview of thyroid eye disease."

Medscape: "Dry Eye Syndrome (Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca)."

American Optometric Association: "Dry Eye."

Journal of Ophthalmic & Vision Research : "Dry Eye Syndrome."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on July 04, 2019

SOURCES:

University of Michigan, Kellogg Eye Center: "Thyroid Eye Disease (TED or Graves Eye Disease)."

Cleveland Clinic: "Thyroid Eye Disease."

British Thyroid Foundation: "Your Thyroid Gland."

The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism: "Thyroid Stimulating Antibodies Are Highly Prevalent in Hashimoto's Thyroiditis and Associated Orbitopathy."

Eye and Vision: "An overview of thyroid eye disease."

Medscape: "Dry Eye Syndrome (Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca)."

American Optometric Association: "Dry Eye."

Journal of Ophthalmic & Vision Research : "Dry Eye Syndrome."

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on July 04, 2019

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When should you call your doctor about your vision if you have diabetes?

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