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What do yellow patches on your eyelid mean?

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Xanthelasma is a condition that involves flat yellow patches on your upper or lower eyelids. These patches or plaques could be a sign of high cholesterol. The patches themselves are harmless, but high cholesterol can make it more likely for you to get serious problems like a heart attack or stroke.

Your doctor can remove the patches if they’re uncomfortable -- they might use chemical peels, surgery, or cryotherapy  -- but they can come back.

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “What Is Blepharitis?”

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: “Types of Eye Allergy.”

NHS: “Eyelid problems.”

American Osteopathic College of Dermatology: “Xanthelasma.”

Cleveland Clinic: “8 Reasons for Your Swollen Eye or Eyelid.”

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus: “Ocular Injury.”

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on March 30, 2019

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “What Is Blepharitis?”

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: “Types of Eye Allergy.”

NHS: “Eyelid problems.”

American Osteopathic College of Dermatology: “Xanthelasma.”

Cleveland Clinic: “8 Reasons for Your Swollen Eye or Eyelid.”

American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus: “Ocular Injury.”

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on March 30, 2019

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