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What happens at an eye exam visit?

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Things you can expect during an eye exam:

  • Patient history. Your doctor will ask about your general health and any family history of eye diseases.
  • Vision tests. The doctor will check your close and distance vision. You'll read from charts of random letters. He or she may also test other aspects of your vision -- like your ability to see in 3-D, your side vision (called peripheral vision), and color perception.
  • Tonometry. This is a test for glaucoma. After numbing your eye with an eye drop, the doctor will measure the eye pressure with a puff of air or by using a device called a tonometer.
  • Eye exam. Your doctor will check all the parts of your eye. You may need drops to dilate -- or widen -- your pupils. This gives the doctor a clear view of the inside of your eye. These drops makes your eyes sensitive to light for a few hours.
  • Other tests. Eye exams can help spot early signs of glaucoma, diabetes, high blood pressure, and arthritis. If the doctor finds anything odd, you may need a follow-up with your regular doctor or a specialist.

From: Eye Doctor Appointment: What to Expect WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "eyeSmart: Eye Screening for Children," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults 40 to 60," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults Over 60," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults Under 40."

American Optometric Association: "Comprehensive Eye and Vision Examination."

Prevent Blindness America: "How Often Should I Have an Eye Exam?"

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on February 17, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "eyeSmart: Eye Screening for Children," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults 40 to 60," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults Over 60," "Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults Under 40."

American Optometric Association: "Comprehensive Eye and Vision Examination."

Prevent Blindness America: "How Often Should I Have an Eye Exam?"

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky on February 17, 2018

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How long will a visit to the eye doctor take?

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