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What lifestyle changes can help you deal with dry eyes?

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There are also everyday changes you can make -- such as trying to blink more often and eating fish that are naturally rich in omega-3 fatty acids -- to help your eyes stay moist. Flax oil, which you take by mouth, can also help.

If you only have dry eye every now and then, or your symptoms are mild, you may be able to get some relief from simple remedies and from over-the-counter eye drops (often called “artificial tears”).

In addition to over-the-counter artificial tears, decongestant eye drops may help. But if you have red eyes, you shouldn’t take them for more than a week, as they can make the redness worse.

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, National Eye Institute: "Facts About Dry Eye."

Mayo Clinic, Diseases and Conditions: "Dry eyes."

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "The link between seasonal allergens and dry eye."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Types of Allergies: Eye Allergy."

Medscape: "Dry, Itchy Eyes Could Mean More Than Just Allergy."

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler on May 31, 2019

SOURCES:

National Institutes of Health, National Eye Institute: "Facts About Dry Eye."

Mayo Clinic, Diseases and Conditions: "Dry eyes."

American Academy of Ophthalmology: "The link between seasonal allergens and dry eye."

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology: "Types of Allergies: Eye Allergy."

Medscape: "Dry, Itchy Eyes Could Mean More Than Just Allergy."

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler on May 31, 2019

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