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How is benign essential blepharospasm treated?

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There's no cure, but several treatments can make it less severe.

The most widely used is botulinum toxin (Botox, Dysport, Xeomin) injected into your eye muscles to ease the spasms. The effect lasts a few months before it slowly wears off and you’ll need another treatment.

For mild cases, medications may provide short-term relief:

  • Clonazepam (Klonopin)
  • Lorazepam (Ativan)
  • Trihexyphenidyl hydrochloride (Artane, Trihexane, Tritane)

If nothing else works, a surgery called myectomy removes some of the muscles and nerves around your eyelid.

SOURCES:

Merz Pharmaceuticals, LLC. 

University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center: "Eyelid Spasms (Eye Twitching or Eye Twitch)" and "Understanding Benign Essential Blepharospasm & Hemifacial Spasm."

National Eye Institute: "Facts About Blepharospasm." 

Dystonia Medical Research Foundation: "Blepharospasm."

Genetics Home Reference: "Benign Essential Blepharospasm."

American Academy of Opthalmology: "Blepharospasm."

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on March 30, 2020

SOURCES:

Merz Pharmaceuticals, LLC. 

University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center: "Eyelid Spasms (Eye Twitching or Eye Twitch)" and "Understanding Benign Essential Blepharospasm & Hemifacial Spasm."

National Eye Institute: "Facts About Blepharospasm." 

Dystonia Medical Research Foundation: "Blepharospasm."

Genetics Home Reference: "Benign Essential Blepharospasm."

American Academy of Opthalmology: "Blepharospasm."

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on March 30, 2020

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