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What is the treatment for eye floaters?

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If you only have mild floaters without a retinal problem, you probably won't need treatment. Or your doctor might use a special laser to get rid of them.

If your floaters are severe, interfere with your vision, and don't go away after several months, you might need surgery to remove and replace the clear gel within your eyeball, though this is not common. The operation is called a vitrectomy.

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Pars Plana Vitrectomy.”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Eye Wiki: Retinal Detachment.”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Posterior Vitreous Detachment, Retinal Breaks, and Lattice Degeneration.”

American Optometric Association: “Recommended Examination Frequency for the Adult Patient.”

American Society of Retinal Specialists: “Posterior Vitreous Detachment.”

Colby, K. Floaters, Merck Manual Professional Version, 2016.

Kahawita, S. Australian Family Physician, published online April 2014.

National Eye Institute: “Facts About Floaters.”

Prevent Blindness America: “What To Know About Floaters.”

Tan, H. American Journal of Ophthalmology, published online March 31, 2011.

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on June 17, 2020

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Pars Plana Vitrectomy.”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Eye Wiki: Retinal Detachment.”

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Posterior Vitreous Detachment, Retinal Breaks, and Lattice Degeneration.”

American Optometric Association: “Recommended Examination Frequency for the Adult Patient.”

American Society of Retinal Specialists: “Posterior Vitreous Detachment.”

Colby, K. Floaters, Merck Manual Professional Version, 2016.

Kahawita, S. Australian Family Physician, published online April 2014.

National Eye Institute: “Facts About Floaters.”

Prevent Blindness America: “What To Know About Floaters.”

Tan, H. American Journal of Ophthalmology, published online March 31, 2011.

Reviewed by Whitney Seltman on June 17, 2020

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