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  • Question 1/12

    Only boys can be color-blind.

  • Answer 1/12

    Only boys can be color-blind.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Boys are just more likely to have it. About one in every 12 has some level of color blindness. It only happens in about one of every 200 girls.

     

    Despite the name, it doesn’t mean you can’t see colors. But it might be hard to tell red from green. There’s also blue-yellow color blindness, but it’s much rarer. People who are truly color-blind have a condition called monochromacy.

  • Question 1/12

    Two parents with brown eyes could have a blue-eyed child.

  • Answer 1/12

    Two parents with brown eyes could have a blue-eyed child.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    We used to think eye color was controlled by a single gene. There was only one possible color your eyes could be. We also believed brown eyes always won out over blue eyes.

     

    Now we know there are at least eight genes that control eye color. That means two brown-eyed parents can, indeed, produce a blue-eyed child. And it’s also why two blue-eyed parents can have a child with green or brown eyes.

  • Question 1/12

    Eye color can't change after you're a baby.

  • Answer 1/12

    Eye color can't change after you're a baby.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Yes, most babies are born with gray or blue eyes. They mightchange color over the course of a year. By about age 6 your eyes are the color they’ll be for the rest of your life. It’s rare, but your eyes could change color when you’re a teen or young adult. The cause is in your genes -- if a family member’s eyes changed, it’s more likely yours will, too.

  • Question 1/12

    Everyone has a blind spot.

  • Answer 1/12

    Everyone has a blind spot.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Even if you have perfect sight, there’s still a blind spot or blank area in your field of vision. You don’t know it’s there because your brain fills in that area with what you expect to see there. Some people’s blind spots are bigger than others, but it’s likely all mammals have them. It’s just the way our eyes are built.

  • Question 1/12

    You can catch a cold through your eyes.

  • Answer 1/12

    You can catch a cold through your eyes.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It’s way too easy: Touch a sick person or a germ-covered surface (like a doorknob), then put your hands on your eyes or nose. The cold virus travels easily through the duct that connects your eyes to your nose and throat. It gets into your body and causes infection. If you don’t want to get sick, keep your hands away from your face, or wash them before you touch it.

  • Question 1/12

    You can lose a contact lens behind your eyeball.

  • Answer 1/12

    You can lose a contact lens behind your eyeball.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Relax. There’s no way a contact lens can slip over the top and get stuck back there forever. The area between your eyelid and eyeball is enclosed in a pouch called the conjunctival sac. The contact can’t get past it. Flush your eye with saline solution to wash out a misplaced lens.

  • Question 1/12

    Wearing glasses all the time weakens your eyes.

  • Answer 1/12

    Wearing glasses all the time weakens your eyes.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can’t wear your glasses too much. Yes, your eyes change as you get older, but that’s going to happen whether you have specs or not. Remember, glasses don’t fix your eye problems, they just help you see better in spite of them. The right pair can also hold off eyestrain headaches.

  • Question 1/12

    You see spots after looking at a bright light because you:

  • Answer 1/12

    You see spots after looking at a bright light because you:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your retina, a bundle of light-sensitive tissue at the back of your eye, reacts to bright light. It can take a while to recover. The spots you see are afterimages.

  • Question 1/12

    Carrots help you see in the dark.

  • Answer 1/12

    Carrots help you see in the dark.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Sorry, mom. Yep, carrots are good for you. But if you already eat well, there’s no proof they help you see better. In fact, some people who eat more carrots have worse night vision. But it may be that these carrot crunchers had bad night vision to begin with.

  • Question 1/12

    If you cross your eyes, they'll get stuck that way.

  • Answer 1/12

    If you cross your eyes, they'll get stuck that way.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Mom wasn’t right about this one, either. Your eyes won’t stay crossed forever, no matter how often you make faces.

  • Question 1/12

    Your eyes are full-size at birth.

  • Answer 1/12

    Your eyes are full-size at birth.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You aren’t born with adult-sized eyeballs. They grow along with the rest of your body up until you’re an adult. That’s why your vision -- and your glasses or contacts prescription -- changes over time.

  • Question 1/12

    How do your eyes "see" an image?

  • Answer 1/12

    How do your eyes "see" an image?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    All your eyes do is process light. It’s your brain that creates the picture. First, your eyes take in light and convert it into electrical nerve signals. They travel to your visual cortex, the part of your brain that controls sight. It converts the signals into the image you see.

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    You correctly answered out of questions.

    Results:

    You see it all! No one can fool you with tall tales about your eyes.

    Results:

    Your view is a little clouded, but you can usually spot a vision whopper.

    Results:

    Uh-oh! You can be fooled by myths about eyesight. 

Sources | Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky, MD on October 13, 2017 Medically Reviewed on October 13, 2017

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky, MD on
October 13, 2017

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

Photos by Carol / Flickr Collection / Getty

SOURCES:

Howard Hughes Medical Institute: “Color Blindness: More Prevalent Among Males.”
University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences: “Color Blindness,” “FYI About Your Eyes,” How We See.”
Bito, L.Z. Archives of Ophthalmology, May 1997.
American Academy of Pediatrics: “Newborn Eye Color.”
Illinois School for the Visually Impaired: “Common Eye Conditions.”
University of Washington, Neuroscience for Kids: “The Blind Spot.”
The Nemours Foundation: “Why Do Eyes Water?” “Vision Myths and Facts.”
NEWTON Ask a Scientist: “Why Do Onions Make You Cry? Ric.”
The Foundation for Better Health Care: “The Common Cold.”
U.K. National Health Service: “Five Facts About Colds.”
American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Keep an Eye on Ultraviolet (UV) Safety.”
The New York Times: “Lenses to Ease the Strain of Staring at Screens.”
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center: “True or False: Eating Carrots Improves Vision.”
Smith, W. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Ophthalmology, June - August 1999.

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