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  • Question 1/10

    Staring at a computer screen all day will ruin your eyes.

  • Answer 1/10

    Staring at a computer screen all day will ruin your eyes.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Yes, too much screen time can make your eyes tired and dry and give you headaches. But there’s no proof it leads to permanent damage. Even so, it’s a good idea to take a break every so often. Follow the 20-20-20 rule: Every 20 minutes, take your eyes off the screen. Focus on an object at least 20 feet away for 20 seconds.

  • Question 1/10

    If you don’t have problems when you read or drive, there’s no reason to get your eyes checked.

  • Answer 1/10

    If you don’t have problems when you read or drive, there’s no reason to get your eyes checked.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You may not notice your vision is worse until the damage is done. Serious eye diseases that come with age, like glaucoma, cataracts, and macular degeneration, often start in middle age. Get an eye exam every 1 to 2 years. That’s the best way to find vision problems and get them treated as early as possible.

  • Answer 1/10

    Which of these can damage your eyesight?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your eye adjusts to account for light and distance. Most of us will find it hard to focus on objects close up by the time we hit our early 40s. Reading glasses, no matter where you buy them, won’t make that worse.

  • Question 1/10

    3-D movies are bad for your eyes.

  • Answer 1/10

    3-D movies are bad for your eyes.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    There’s no reason a 3-D movie or video game should hurt your vision.  You might get headaches or motion sickness while you watch or play. But those symptoms could signal an existing problem, like poor depth perception. 

  • Question 1/10

    Seeing halos around lights is normal.

  • Answer 1/10

    Seeing halos around lights is normal.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you see halos, go to the eye doctor. The shape of your cornea could be off. That’s normal. Your eye doctor should be able to fix it with a tweak to your prescription.

    But halos can also signal more serious eye problems like cataracts, where your vision gets cloudy, or glaucoma, where pressure builds up in your eye and can cause blindness.

  • Question 1/10

    Most of the time, floaters are nothing to worry about.

  • Answer 1/10

    Most of the time, floaters are nothing to worry about.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    As you get older, the gel inside your eye clumps up. You’ll start to notice little black squiggles that bounce around in your field of vision. Usually they’re nothing to worry about.

    But if suddenly you notice a lot more of them, your vision quickly gets worse, or you see flashes of light, call the eye doctor. Your retina could be torn or detached from the back of your eye.

  • Question 1/10

    Sunglasses are like sunscreen for your eyes. You should wear them.

  • Answer 1/10

    Sunglasses are like sunscreen for your eyes. You should wear them.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Shades are more than a fashion statement. Bright sunlight can up your odds of eye problems like cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Looking directly at the sun can cause permanent damage to your retinas.

    So how do you choose a good pair? Lens color doesn’t matter. Look for sunglasses that block 100% of both UVA and UVB rays. Choose lenses that wrap around to your temples. They block more light.

  • Question 1/10

    Smoking ups your risk of getting cataracts.

  • Answer 1/10

    Smoking ups your risk of getting cataracts.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    If you smoked when you were young, you’re more likely to get cataracts when you’re older. It can also worsen the symptoms of other eye conditions. Ask your doctor for help to kick the habit for good.

  • Answer 1/10

    Call your eye doctor if:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A blank spot right in the center of your vision isn’t normal. It’s caused by age-related macular degeneration, one of the most common causes of vision loss in older adults. You'll want to diagnose and treat it early, so call the eye doctor ASAP.

    A tender, red bump on the edge of your eyelid could be a stye or a clogged gland called a chalazion. Use a clean, warm compress three to five times a day. It should drain on its own. Don't squeeze or try to "pop" it. See a doctor if it doesn't get better.

    A twitch is annoying, but should go away on its own. See your doctor if it lasts longer than a week.

  • Question 1/10

    Eyesight gets worse as you age.

  • Answer 1/10

    Eyesight gets worse as you age.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You can’t control genetics and aging. So yeah, you may need reading glasses or have a trouble when you try to drive at night. But you can   do things to stave off other problems:

    • Eat well.
    • Don’t smoke.
    • Protect your eyes from sunlight.
    • Get regular eye checkups.
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    Results:

    You're seeing clearly! You know the signs of vision loss.

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Sources | Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler, MD on November 23, 2016 Medically Reviewed on November 23, 2016

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler, MD on
November 23, 2016

IMAGES PROVIDED BY:

Panoramic Images

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Chalazion and Stye Treatment,” “Computer Use and Eyestrain?” “Vision Screening Recommendations for Adults 40 to 60,” “What is Age-Related macular Degeneration?” “Eyeglasses for Vision Correction,” “What is Glaucoma?” “What are Cataracts?” “Floaters and Flashes Treatment,” “Tips for Eye Health in Adults Under 40,” “What is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?” “Macular Degeneration Symptoms,” “Macular Degeneration Treatment,” “Dry AMD and Nutritional Supplements,” “What Is an Eyelid Spasm or Twitching Eyelid?”
University of Rochester Medical Center: “The Eye Quiz.”
U.S. Department of Education: “Homework: A Concern for the Whole Family.”
Illinois School for the Visually Impaired: “Common Eye Conditions.”
Washington Academy of Eye Physicians & Surgeons: “Treating Your Eyes> Diseases.”
Hogg, R.E. Ophthalmology , 2009. 

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.