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  • Question 1/16

    As many adults are farsighted as are nearsighted.

  • Answer 1/16

    As many adults are farsighted as are nearsighted.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Around 10 times more people are nearsighted than farsighted.

  • Question 1/16

    Bifocals have been around since ...

  • Answer 1/16

    Bifocals have been around since ...

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    American Founding Father Ben Franklin had presbyopia, an inability to focus close-up that usually happens as you age. He described his invention, which has lenses for both far and near vision, in a letter to a friend in 1784.

  • Answer 1/16

    Progressive lenses ...

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You might hear them called multifocal lenses or no-line bifocals. They let you see things clearly at different distances. You probably won’t need bifocals until after age 40.

  • Question 1/16

    There’s no difference between drugstore readers and custom reading glasses.

  • Answer 1/16

    There’s no difference between drugstore readers and custom reading glasses.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Each eye has a different prescription. Plus, custom lenses are made to account for the specific distance between your eyes. Still, store-bought glasses are cheap enough that you can have several pairs. It won’t hurt to use them -- unless you’re skipping regular eye exams.

  • Question 1/16

    Who 's more likely to wear contact lenses?

  • Answer 1/16

    Who 's more likely to wear contact lenses?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    A study published in Optometry and Vision Sciencefound that women are 40% more likely than men to wear contact lenses.

  • Question 1/16

    Clean your contact lenses -- and their case -- regularly.

  • Answer 1/16

    Clean your contact lenses -- and their case -- regularly.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    After each use, rinse the case with fresh contact lens solution and leave it open to dry. Replace it every 2 or 3 months -- or right away if it’s cracked or has other damage.

  • Answer 1/16

    It might be OK to sleep in ...

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Yes, extended-wear contacts are designed to be worn for several days and nights. Up to a week is a safe bet for most. But not all doctors agree. Many say not to sleep in any type of contact lenses. It can make you more likely to get an infection. If you do hit the hay with your contacts in, tell your doctor at the first sign of any eye problems -- pain, discharge, or a change in vision.

  • Question 1/16

    Rub your lenses even if you use a no-rub solution.

  • Answer 1/16

    Rub your lenses even if you use a no-rub solution.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    No matter what solution you use, eye doctors say to rub the lenses with your fingers first. Rinse them with solution before you soak them. 

  • Question 1/16

    It's OK to use someone else's glasses.

  • Answer 1/16

    It's OK to use someone else's glasses.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Glasses are unique. No two people have the same prescription. Looking at the world through someone else’s lenses won’t permanently harm your eyes, but it can cause eyestrain and headaches.

  • Question 1/16

    Always get UV-protective coating on your lenses.

  • Answer 1/16

    Always get UV-protective coating on your lenses.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Shatter-resistant polycarbonate lenses, commonly used in sports, usually come with full ultraviolet protection. So do high-index lenses, a lightweight type can help you avoid thick lenses if you have a strong prescription. But UV coating is a good idea if you get less expensive lenses made of a plastic called CR-39.

  • Question 1/16

    Lenses that get darker in bright light work best ...

  • Answer 1/16

    Lenses that get darker in bright light work best ...

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    They aren’t so great for cars or airplanes. Windows block the light rays that trigger the tint to change.

  • Answer 1/16

    Doctors correct astigmatism with:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Astigmatism means light doesn’t focus evenly on the back of the eye. Glasses are the simplest fix, but special soft contacts or rigid ones also work. LASIK or other surgery helps some people.

  • Answer 1/16

    Rigid, gas-permeable contact lenses ...

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    These hard lenses let oxygen flow through to the eye. They’re also more durable, and may provide clearer vision, than soft lenses.

  • Answer 1/16

    What do circle lenses do?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    You should seriously weigh the pros and cons of wearing contact lenses for a different look. Talk to your eye doctor -- he can supply the look you want and give you the periodic exams required for all people who wear contacts. The lenses you get from costume shops are illegal and could hurt your eyes.

  • Question 1/16

    If your kid’s too young to read an eye chart, she can’t get glasses.

  • Answer 1/16

    If your kid’s too young to read an eye chart, she can’t get glasses.

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Your child’s doctors will use a special tool to shine light in her eye and watch how it reflects off her retina. If he sees a problem, he’ll test different lenses to see which one provides the best fix.

  • Answer 1/16

    If your contact lens comes out and you don't have your usual supplies ...

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Saliva and tap water are unsafe. If you wear soft contacts, put the lens in saline or soaking solution as soon as you can. Then disinfect it. (If it’s damaged or irritates your eye, don’t use it.) If you wear disposables, replace the lens with a new one. If you use gas-permeable lenses, store the lens dry until you can care for it.

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Sources | Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler, MD on February 02, 2018 Medically Reviewed on February 02, 2018

Reviewed by Brian S. Boxer Wachler, MD on
February 02, 2018

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

HELEN MCARDLE / Science Photo Library

SOURCES:

Vitale, S. Archives of Ophthalmology , August 2008.
Independence Hall Association: USHistory.org: “Benjamin Franklin’s Inventions, Discoveries, and Improvements.”
National Eye Institute: “Facts About Presbyopia.”
Consumers Union: Consumer Reports.org: “Lens lingo: Guide to Eyeglass Choices.”
American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Eyeglasses for Vision Correction.”
Andrea P. Thau, OD, FAAO, FCOVD, associate clinical professor, State University of New York (SUNY) State College of Optometry, New York; spokeswoman, American Optometric Association.
Beth Kneib, OD, director, Clinical and Practice Advancement Group, American Optometric Association.
Swanson, MW. Optometry and Vision Science, June 2012.
American Academy of Ophthalmology: “Important Things to Know About Contact Lenses,” “Proper Care of Contact Lenses,” “Contact Lens Types,” “Eyeglasses for Vision Correction,” “Astigmatism Treatment,” “Decorative Contact Lenses.”
Food and Drug Administration: “Types of Contact Lenses.”
American Optometric Association: “Contact Lens Care,” “Advantages and Disadvantages of Various Types of Contact Lenses.”
University of Cincinnati, Ohio State University, Case Western Reserve University: “Eye and Vision Care: Wrong Prescription.”
Consumers Union: “Lens lingo: Guide to Eyeglass Choices.”
National Eye Institute: “Facts About Astigmatism.”
University of Illinois at Chicago Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences: “Rigid Contact Lenses.”
University of Iowa Health Care: Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences: “What Are the Advantages and Disadvantages of Soft Contact Lenses Compared to RGP’s (Rigid Gas Permeable Lenses)?”
American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus: “How Can a Child Be Tested for Glasses in Early Childhood?” “Retinoscopy.”

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