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  • Question 1/13

    Doctors can tell if you have high cholesterol by looking at your eyes.

  • Answer 1/13

    Doctors can tell if you have high cholesterol by looking at your eyes.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Not only can the doctor diagnose eye problems during your exam, he may be able to see signs of high cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes, and other medical conditions. Damage to the blood vessels at the back of eye is often the first physical sign of a health problem. At the end of your exam, the doctor will let you know if you need further tests or follow up to protect your vision and overall health.

  • Question 1/13

    Irritated eyes and blurry vision at work could mean:

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    Answer 1/13

    Irritated eyes and blurry vision at work could mean:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Eyestrain, red eyes, blurry vision, and irritation can all be a reaction to too much screen time. Take regular breaks to rest your eyes, install anti-glare filters, change the position of your computer monitor, add anti-glare filters, and make sure you have enough light. Lubricating eye drops and special computer glasses also might help.

  • Question 1/13

    If your mom or dad needs glasses, you probably will, too.

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    Answer 1/13

    If your mom or dad needs glasses, you probably will, too.

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    • Correct Answer:

    Two of the most common eye problems -- nearsightedness (myopia) and farsightedness (hyperopia) -- are usually inherited. If you’re nearsighted, it’s hard to see things that are far away, but you can focus up close just fine. If you’re farsighted, it’s just the opposite. You can’t see close up, but you’re eagle-eyed at a distance.

  • Question 1/13

    How old are you when it gets hard to read a menu?

  • Answer 1/13

    How old are you when it gets hard to read a menu?

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    • Correct Answer:

    Why does it get harder to read the fine print? As your eyes age, the lenses can’t change shape enough to get a clear focus on close objects. This is called presbyopia. It, along with myopia, hyperopia, and astigmatism, are all in a group of problems called refractive errors. That means your eye doesn’t focus light evenly onto your retina.

  • Question 1/13

    Sudden double vision may be a symptom of:

  • Answer 1/13

    Sudden double vision may be a symptom of:

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    • Correct Answer:

    Double vision can be caused by eye problems like cataract or brain problems like stroke. If your double vision goes away when one eye is closed but returns when both eyes are open, it could be a problem with the nerves and muscles that move your eyes and keep them aligned.

  • Question 1/13

    Most children are a little bit:

  • Answer 1/13

    Most children are a little bit:

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    • Correct Answer:

    But you might not know because their eyes work differently than an adult’s. Farsighted grownups have trouble when they read or try to look at things up close because light rays enter their eye and focus past the retina, not on it. But kids’ eyes can focus the light rays and put them on the retina. So their vision isn’t blurry. You can tell if they have a problem if they complain about tired, sore, or burning eyes and headaches. That means their peepers are working too hard.

  • Question 1/13

    Color blind means you can't see:

  • Answer 1/13

    Color blind means you can't see:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    It doesn’t mean you see the world in shades of gray. That only happens in a severe and rare form of color blindness. Most people just have trouble telling reds and greens apart. It results from a problem with the cells -- called cones -- on your retina that help tell the difference between red, green, and blue.

  • Question 1/13

    What boosts your odds of getting cataracts?

  • Answer 1/13

    What boosts your odds of getting cataracts?

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    • Correct Answer:

    If things are blurry, cloudy, or not as bright as they used to be, you could have a cataract. That's when the lens of your eye turns cloudy. Some people say it’s like looking through a dirty car windshield. In the U.S., most people older than 60 have signs of cataracts. Causes include age, high blood pressure, diabetes, and too much sunlight.

  • Question 1/13

    What’s the leading cause of permanent vision loss in Americans over 50?

  • Answer 1/13

    What’s the leading cause of permanent vision loss in Americans over 50?

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    • Correct Answer:

    More than 3.5 million people have early stages of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). As its name suggests, it’s a disease of the macula, the part of the retina that controls your central vision. That’s what allows you to thread a needle or read small print. It usually sets in as you get older. It often leaves you with only side, or peripheral, vision.

  • Question 1/13

    What causes yellow eyes?

  • Answer 1/13

    What causes yellow eyes?

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    • Correct Answer:

    If your skin and whites of the eyes turn yellow, it’s usually a sign that something is wrong with your liver, gallbladder, or pancreas. Infections, cancer, and blood disorders are among the conditions that can cause jaundice. If your skin is yellow or orange but the whites of your eyes aren’t, you might be eating too many foods high in an orange pigment called beta carotene. It’s what gives carrots their color.

  • Question 1/13

    Why are people with diabetes more likely to have eye problems?

  • Answer 1/13

    Why are people with diabetes more likely to have eye problems?

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Each of these conditions can damage your eye’s retina, lens, and optic nerve. Diabetes makes you more likely to get glaucoma, cataracts, and a condition called diabetic retinopathy. It makes blood vessels in your retina swell and leak fluids into your eye. It can also cause new blood vessels to grow where they shouldn’t.

  • Question 1/13

    What is amblyopia?

  • Answer 1/13

    What is amblyopia?

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    • Correct Answer:

    It gets this name because one eye doesn’t develop like it should and the other one has to work harder. It’s usually diagnosed in childhood. The doctor may cover the stronger eye with a patch or prescribe eye drops that make the good eye weaker. Over time, the lazy eye gets stronger and vision develops like it should.

  • Question 1/13

    A temporary blind spot may be a sign of:

  • Answer 1/13

    A temporary blind spot may be a sign of:

    • You answered:
    • Correct Answer:

    Also known as a retinal migraine, this type of headache can cause vision loss or a temporary blind spot, usually in one eye. The vision problems are linked to the headache and should last less than an hour.

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Sources | Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky, MD on October 13, 2017 Medically Reviewed on October 13, 2017

Reviewed by Alan Kozarsky, MD on
October 13, 2017

IMAGE PROVIDED BY:

Panoramic Images

SOURCES:

American Academy of Ophthalmology, “Amblyopia: Lazy Eye Diagnosis,” “Amblyopia: What is Lazy Eye?” “Farsightedness: Causes of Hyperopia,” “Nearsightedness: What is Myopia?" “What are Cataracts?" “What is Age-Related Macular Degeneration?” “What is Diabetic Retinopathy?”
American Optometric Association, “Adult Vision: 41 to 60 Years of Age,” “Diabetes Is the Leading Cause of Blindness Among Most Adults,” “Hyperopia (Farsightedness),” “Myopia (Nearsightedness).”
Blehm, C. Survey of Ophthalmology May-June 2005;50 (3):253-62Blue Cross, Blue Shield of Michigan, “For a Healthier You…”
Cleveland Clinic, “Retinal Detachment.”
Harvard Health Publications, Harvard Medical School, “Eye Exams, High Blood Pressure Symptoms and Diabetes Symptoms”
KidsHealth.org, “What It’s Like to be Color Blind.”
Medline Plus, “Cataract,” “Eyelid Twitch,” “Farsightedness,” “Jaundice.”
National Eye Institute, “Common Eye Problems,” “Facts about Dry Eye,” “Facts about Refractive Errors.”
National Headache Foundation, “Ophthalmic Migraine.”
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, “Headache: Hope Through Research”Prasad, Sashank, “Double Vision.”
Division of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School  Pub Med Health, “Color blindness.”
PubMed Health, “Diabetes and Eye Disease,” “Glaucoma.”
University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Services “Crossed Eyes/Amblyopia.”
University of Iowa Hospitals & Clinics, “Diabetic Eye Problems.”
University of Maryland Medical Center, “Cataracts – Prevention.”
Wilmer Eye Institute at Johns Hopkins, “Cataracts," “Macular Degeneration.”

This tool does not provide medical advice.
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THIS TOOL DOES NOT PROVIDE MEDICAL ADVICE. It is intended for general informational purposes only and does not address individual circumstances. It is not a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment and should not be relied on to make decisions about your health. Never ignore professional medical advice in seeking treatment because of something you have read on the WebMD Site. If you think you may have a medical emergency, immediately call your doctor or dial 911.