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How is fibro fog related to fatigue?

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Severe fatigue -- more than just being tired -- affects up to 4 out of 5 of people with fibromyalgia. It often goes hand-in-hand with sleepless nights. Together, they leave you drained and exhausted.

While scientists are learning more about what's happening in your brain that causes the pain and some other symptoms, what's behind fibro fog remains unclear. That name says it all: a fuzzy-headed feeling that keeps you from thinking clearly. You may get distracted, forget or lose things, and struggle to keep up with conversations.

Over half of people with fibromyalgia say they have these kinds of problems, and many feel the fog impacts their lives more than the pain, tenderness, and fatigue.

From: Fibro Fog and Fatigue WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Pain Practice: "Energy Expenditure during Functional Daily Life Performances in Patients with Fibromyalgia."

Current Pain and Headache Reports: "Cognitive Impairment in Fibromyalgia."

PLoS ONE : "Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Can Diminish Fibromyalgia Syndrome -- Prospective Clinical Trial."

Arthritis Foundation: "Fibro Fog," "Explaining Fibromyalgia to Other People."

NeuroImage: Clinical : "Characterizing 'fibrofog': Subjective appraisal, objective performance, and task-related brain activity during a working memory task."

Rheumatology International: "Fibrofog and fibromyalgia: a narrative review and implications for clinical practice."

Pain Management: "How to manage fatigue in fibromyalgia: nonpharmacological options."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Questions and Answers about Fibromyalgia."

Clinical Rheumatology: "Fear of movement and avoidance behaviour toward physical activity in chronic-fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia: state of the art and implications for clinical practice."

National Fibromyalgia Association: "Treatment."

WomensHealth.gov: "Fibromyalgia."

UpToDate: "Treatment of fibromyalgia in adults not responsive to initial therapies."

Mayo Clinic: "Fibromyalgia: Treatment."

American Family Physician: " Common Questions About the Diagnosis and Management of Fibromyalgia."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on August 23, 2017

SOURCES:

Pain Practice: "Energy Expenditure during Functional Daily Life Performances in Patients with Fibromyalgia."

Current Pain and Headache Reports: "Cognitive Impairment in Fibromyalgia."

PLoS ONE : "Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy Can Diminish Fibromyalgia Syndrome -- Prospective Clinical Trial."

Arthritis Foundation: "Fibro Fog," "Explaining Fibromyalgia to Other People."

NeuroImage: Clinical : "Characterizing 'fibrofog': Subjective appraisal, objective performance, and task-related brain activity during a working memory task."

Rheumatology International: "Fibrofog and fibromyalgia: a narrative review and implications for clinical practice."

Pain Management: "How to manage fatigue in fibromyalgia: nonpharmacological options."

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Questions and Answers about Fibromyalgia."

Clinical Rheumatology: "Fear of movement and avoidance behaviour toward physical activity in chronic-fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia: state of the art and implications for clinical practice."

National Fibromyalgia Association: "Treatment."

WomensHealth.gov: "Fibromyalgia."

UpToDate: "Treatment of fibromyalgia in adults not responsive to initial therapies."

Mayo Clinic: "Fibromyalgia: Treatment."

American Family Physician: " Common Questions About the Diagnosis and Management of Fibromyalgia."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on August 23, 2017

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Should you exercise if you have fibro fog and fatigue?

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