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How is fibromyalgia diagnosed?

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Your doctor will examine you and ask you about your past medical issues and about other close family members.

There's no test that can tell you that you have fibromyalgia. Instead, because the symptoms are so similar to other conditions, your doctor will want to rule out illnesses such as an underactive thyroid, different types of arthritis, and lupus. So, you may get blood tests to check hormone levels and signs of inflammation, as well as X-rays.

If your doctor can't find another reason for how you feel, they'll use a two-part scoring system to measure how widespread your pain has been and how much your symptoms affect your daily life. Using those results, together you'll come up with a plan to manage the condition.

From: What Is Fibromyalgia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: "What Is Fibromyalgia?"

Arthritis Foundation: "Fibromyalgia: What Is It?"

American Fibromyalgia Syndrome Association: "What Is Fibromyalgia?"

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Fast Facts About Fibromyalgia."

McIlwain, H. Holt, 2007. The Fibromyalgia Handbook,

Behm, F. , 2012. BMC Clinical Pathology

Reviewed by William Blahd on August 26, 2017

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: "What Is Fibromyalgia?"

Arthritis Foundation: "Fibromyalgia: What Is It?"

American Fibromyalgia Syndrome Association: "What Is Fibromyalgia?"

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Fast Facts About Fibromyalgia."

McIlwain, H. Holt, 2007. The Fibromyalgia Handbook,

Behm, F. , 2012. BMC Clinical Pathology

Reviewed by William Blahd on August 26, 2017

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How is fibromyalgia treated?

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