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How long do sessions of acupuncture last?

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Sessions usually last at least 20 minutes. The first session will last longer because your practitioner will ask you questions. He'll typically want to know how long you've had your symptoms, how severe they are, and what your general health is like. He'll also do a quick medical exam, take your pulse, and check for any sore or tender spots.

From: Can Acupuncture Help My Fibromyalgia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: "Acupuncture for Fibromyalgia."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Mind and Body Practices for Fibromyalgia: What the Science Says."

BioMed Central: Systematic Reviews: "An overview of systematic reviews of complementary and alternative therapies for fibromyalgia using both AMSTAR and ROBIS as quality assessment tools."

Chinese Medicine : "Effects of acupuncture to treat fibromyalgia: A preliminary randomised controlled trial."

Mayo Clinic Proceedings : "Improvement in Fibromyalgia Symptoms With Acupuncture: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial."

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews : "Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia."

Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine : "Utilization of Group-Based, Community Acupuncture Clinics: A Comparative Study with a Nationally Representative Sample of Acupuncture User."

National Health Service (UK): "Acupuncture."

Acupuncture in Medicine : "Acupuncture for fibromyalgia in primary care: a randomised controlled trial."

British Acupuncture Council: "What to expect from a treatment."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Fibromyalgia: In Depth."

FDA: "CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21."

National Certification Commission for Acupuncture: "Find a Practitioner Directory,"

American Academy of Medical Acupuncture: "Welcome."

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews : Plain Language Summaries: "Acupuncture for fibromyalgia."

American Academy of Medical Acupuncture: "Patient Referral Directory."

Mayo Clinic: "Acupuncture."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on August 29, 2017

SOURCES:

Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services: "Acupuncture for Fibromyalgia."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Mind and Body Practices for Fibromyalgia: What the Science Says."

BioMed Central: Systematic Reviews: "An overview of systematic reviews of complementary and alternative therapies for fibromyalgia using both AMSTAR and ROBIS as quality assessment tools."

Chinese Medicine : "Effects of acupuncture to treat fibromyalgia: A preliminary randomised controlled trial."

Mayo Clinic Proceedings : "Improvement in Fibromyalgia Symptoms With Acupuncture: Results of a Randomized Controlled Trial."

The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews : "Acupuncture for treating fibromyalgia."

Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine : "Utilization of Group-Based, Community Acupuncture Clinics: A Comparative Study with a Nationally Representative Sample of Acupuncture User."

National Health Service (UK): "Acupuncture."

Acupuncture in Medicine : "Acupuncture for fibromyalgia in primary care: a randomised controlled trial."

British Acupuncture Council: "What to expect from a treatment."

National Center for Complementary and Integrative Health: "Fibromyalgia: In Depth."

FDA: "CFR - Code of Federal Regulations Title 21."

National Certification Commission for Acupuncture: "Find a Practitioner Directory,"

American Academy of Medical Acupuncture: "Welcome."

Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews : Plain Language Summaries: "Acupuncture for fibromyalgia."

American Academy of Medical Acupuncture: "Patient Referral Directory."

Mayo Clinic: "Acupuncture."

Reviewed by Melinda Ratini on August 29, 2017

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How many needles do acupuncture treatments use?

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