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What can help to manage fibromyalgia?

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Regular moderate exercise is key to controlling fibromylagia. You'll want to do low-impact activities that build your endurance, stretch and strengthen your muscles, and improve your ability to move easily -- like yoga, tai chi, Pilates, and even walking. Exercise also releases endorphins, which fight pain, stress, and feeling down -- and it can help you sleep better.

You can try complementary therapies, including massage, acupuncture, and chiropractic manipulation, to ease aches and stress. A counselor, therapist, or support group may help you deal with difficult emotions and how to explain to others what's going on with you.

From: What Is Fibromyalgia? WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: "What Is Fibromyalgia?"

Arthritis Foundation: "Fibromyalgia: What Is It?"

American Fibromyalgia Syndrome Association: "What Is Fibromyalgia?"

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Fast Facts About Fibromyalgia."

McIlwain, H. Holt, 2007. The Fibromyalgia Handbook,

Behm, F. , 2012. BMC Clinical Pathology

Reviewed by William Blahd on August 26, 2017

SOURCES:

American College of Rheumatology: "What Is Fibromyalgia?"

Arthritis Foundation: "Fibromyalgia: What Is It?"

American Fibromyalgia Syndrome Association: "What Is Fibromyalgia?"

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases: "Fast Facts About Fibromyalgia."

McIlwain, H. Holt, 2007. The Fibromyalgia Handbook,

Behm, F. , 2012. BMC Clinical Pathology

Reviewed by William Blahd on August 26, 2017

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