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How do you use automated external defibrillator (AED)?

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For newborns, infants, and children up to age 8, use a pediatric AED, if possible. If not, use an adult AED.

  • Turn on the AED.
  • Wipe chest dry.
  • Attach pads.
  • Plug in connector, if necessary.
  • Make sure no one is touching the person.
  • Push “Analyze” button.
  • If a shock is advised, check again to make sure no one is touching the person.
  • Push “Shock” button.
  • Start or resume chest compressions.
  • For an adult, see The Importance of CPR for information about giving CPR.
  • For a child, see CPR for Children.
  • Follow AED prompts.
  • After 2 minutes of CPR, check the person’s heart rhythm. If it’s still absent or irregular, give another shock.
  • If a shock isn’t needed, continue CPR until emergency help arrives or the person starts to move.
  • Stay with the person until help arrives.

SOURCES:

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: “How to Use an Automated External Defibrillator.”

American Red Cross: “Hands-Only Citizen CPR.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Ventricular Fibrillation and the Use of Automated External Defibrillators on Children.”

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on January 24, 2018

SOURCES:

National Heart Lung and Blood Institute: “How to Use an Automated External Defibrillator.”

American Red Cross: “Hands-Only Citizen CPR.”

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Ventricular Fibrillation and the Use of Automated External Defibrillators on Children.”

Reviewed by Suzanne R. Steinbaum on January 24, 2018

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