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How is a fever diagnosed?

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Although a fever is easy to measure, determining its cause can be hard. Besides a physical exam, your doctor will ask about symptoms and conditions, medications, and if you've recently traveled to areas with infections or have other infection risks. A malaria infection, for example, may be have a fever that typically recurs. Some areas of the U.S. are hotspots for infections such as Lyme disease and Rocky Mountain spotted fever.

Sometimes, you may have a "fever of unknown origin." In such cases, the cause could be an unusual or not obvious condition such as a chronic infection, a connective tissue disorder, cancer, or another problem.

From: Fever Facts WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Fever.” 

National Cancer Institute: “Fever.”

Cunha, B.A. , December 2007. Infectious Disease Clinics of North American

KidsHealth.org: “Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature.”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on April 27, 2019

SOURCES:

American Academy of Pediatrics: “Fever.” 

National Cancer Institute: “Fever.”

Cunha, B.A. , December 2007. Infectious Disease Clinics of North American

KidsHealth.org: “Fever and Taking Your Child's Temperature.”

Reviewed by Carol DerSarkissian on April 27, 2019

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How is a fever treated?

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