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How is internal bleeding treated?

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Internal bleeding is when you lose blood inside your body. You’ll most likely be taken to the ER. You’ll get fluids injected to keep your blood pressure from falling dangerously low. An ultrasound, a CT scan, or both can show if you’re bleeding inside. Depending on your condition, your doctors may decide to take you to surgery, or watch and wait. Sometimes, internal bleeding from trauma stops on its own. If you’re seriously injured, doctors may operate on your within minutes after you get to the hospital.

From: Internal Bleeding Due to Trauma WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

Cameron, J. 10th edition, Churchill Livingstone, 2011. Current Surgical Therapy,

Diercks, D. , 2011. Annals of Emergency Medicine

Browner, B. 4th edition, W.B. Saunders, 2008. Skeletal Trauma,

American Heart Association. 

 

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on October 23, 2017

SOURCES:

Cameron, J. 10th edition, Churchill Livingstone, 2011. Current Surgical Therapy,

Diercks, D. , 2011. Annals of Emergency Medicine

Browner, B. 4th edition, W.B. Saunders, 2008. Skeletal Trauma,

American Heart Association. 

 

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on October 23, 2017

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What types of surgery are used to treat internal bleeding?

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