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What can you do to avoid motion sickness?

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You can do a few things to try to help with motion sickness:

  • Lay off caffeine, alcohol, and big meals before the trip. Drink lots of water instead.
  • Lie down if you can, or shut your eyes, and keep your head still. Look at the horizon -- don’t read or stare at the seat in front of you.
  • Find a better spot. Many people find relief by taking the wheel. If you’re not driving, sit in the front seat rather than in back. If you’re in a plane, sit over the wing rather than in the front or extreme back. If you’re on a bus or train, try to get a seat that faces the way you’re going.
  • Add some distractions -- music, for example.
  • Eat something. Dry crackers may calm a queasy stomach. Suck on a lozenge. (Something with ginger in it may be especially helpful.) Light, fizzy drinks, like ginger ale, also can help.
  • There’s some evidence that bands that put pressure on your wrist -- some send small electrical stimulation to a specific area -- can help, but other studies have shown that they don’t.

From: How to Beat Motion Sickness WebMD Medical Reference

SOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Prevention and Treatment of Motion Sickness."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Car Sickness."

CDC: "Traveler’s Health: Motion Sickness."

Lackner, J. , June 2014. Experimental Brain Research

Mayo Clinic: "Motion Sickness: First Aid."

Mount Sinai Hospital: "Motion Sickness."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Motion sickness."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "The Human Balance System."

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on November 7, 2018

SOURCES:

American Academy of Family Physicians: "Prevention and Treatment of Motion Sickness."

American Academy of Pediatrics: "Car Sickness."

CDC: "Traveler’s Health: Motion Sickness."

Lackner, J. , June 2014. Experimental Brain Research

Mayo Clinic: "Motion Sickness: First Aid."

Mount Sinai Hospital: "Motion Sickness."

University of Maryland Medical Center: "Motion sickness."

Vestibular Disorders Association: "The Human Balance System."

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on November 7, 2018

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