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What causes lightheadedness?

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Lightheadedness is usually caused by some surrounding circumstance impairing blood flow to the brain when a person is standing up. It's a challenge for the heart to keep the brain supplied with blood when we are upright -- and it's easy for this system to break down. Common causes include pooling of blood in your lower legs from sitting or standing too long, a very slow or very fast heart rate, low blood pressure from medications or nervous system dysfunction, blood pressure medications, and dehydration. Diseases such as aortic valve stenosis can also cause lightheadedness. 

SOURCES:

The American Academy of Otolaryngologyc -- Head and Neck Surgery: "Dizziness and Motion Sickness."

The Mayo Clinic: "Dizziness."

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on April 1, 2019

SOURCES:

The American Academy of Otolaryngologyc -- Head and Neck Surgery: "Dizziness and Motion Sickness."

The Mayo Clinic: "Dizziness."

Reviewed by Sabrina Felson on April 1, 2019

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What causes disequilibrium?

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